Who Is At Risk For Osteoporosis

Osteoporosis, meaning “porous bones”, is a condition that causes bones to slowly thin and weaken, leaving them susceptible to fractures. With an aging population, osteoporosis becomes increasingly common in America. After age 50, 50% of women and 25% of men are at considerable risk for osteoporosis.

In the U.S., more than 10 million men and women have osteoporosis. An additional 34 million people have low bone mass and are at high risk of developing osteoporosis. About 1.5 million fractures take place every year because of osteoporosis.

Inflammation Accelerates Bone Loss

Osteoporosis, like heart disease, cancer, and diabetes, is not a natural consequence of aging. Instead, chronic degenerative diseases usually arise from long-term nutritional, lifestyle, and environmental imbalances that lead to buildup of inflammatory toxins.

Even though the precise cause of osteoporosis is unknown, the process by which bone turns into porous is well understood. Bone remodeling is regulated by a variety of hormones and inflammatory mediators. When the body is exposed to inflammatory toxins, bone breakdown is overtaking bone buildup or bone resorption occurs at a faster speed than bone production. Both processes could result in bone loss and osteoporosis.

Clinical studies have revealed that buildup inflammatory cytokines are primary mediators of the enhanced bone loss at menopause. Different studies also confirm increases in the risk of developing osteoporosis in various inflammatory conditions, including rheumatoid arthritis, inflammatory bowel diseases (IBD), periodontitis, and multiple myeloma.

In periodontal disease, oral inflammation results in destruction of oral bone and periodontal ligament, eventually leading to tooth loss. Further evidence suggests that a variety of inflammatory mediators activate osteoclasts, bone cells that take away the bone tissue and cause bone resorption.

Diabetes Drugs May Thin The Bones

A popular class of drugs for type 2 diabetes, i.e., thiazolidinediones (marketed as Avandia and Actos), had already been linked to heart problems. Recent study showed that using these diabetes drugs for more than a year thins the bones and increases the risk of fractures in women with type 2 diabetes, who are already at higher risk before taking the medications.

Solution

Now question arises, how to get rid of Osteoporosis? Answer is not very simple but luckily there are some people around who have done research on that and put all the info about Osteoporosis and how to cope with it in their writing. And the best one I have came through so far is

Osteoporosis & Osteopenia: Vitamin Therapy for Stronger Bones by Bryant Lusk

The book covers all the aspects of Osteoporosis. From symptoms to the solution. Topic it majorly covers are

  • Keeping your miraculous bones strong
  • Dangerous myths about vitamins and minerals
  • How popular fat burners harm your bones
  • What young adults should do now to avoid osteoporosis
  • The real solution to vitamin D deficiency

And so many other topic related to it. Definitely a well researched material. So what you need to do is to follow all the instructions mentioned in the book and you will feel the improvement within days. But surely you need to buy the book first. It’s available in kindle edition as well as paperback.