By John Adams

Inderal (propranolol) is a beta-blocker. What are beta blockers ? Beta-blockers affect the heart and circulation (blood flow through arteries and veins)Propranolol is used to treat tremors, angina (chest pain), hypertension (high blood pressure), heart rhythm disorders, and other heart or circulatory conditions. It is also used to treat or prevent heart attack, and to reduce the severity and frequency of migraine headaches.

You should not use Inderal if you are allergic to propranolol, if you have asthma, a slow heart rate, or a serious heart condition such as “sick sinus syndrome” or “AV block” (unless you have a pacemaker). If you need surgery, tell the surgeon ahead of time that you are using Inderal. You may need to stop using the medicine for a short time. Do not skip doses or stop using Inderal without first talking to your doctor. You may need to use less and less before you stop the medication completely. Video: Treatment for Depression Treatments for depression are getting better everyday and there are things you can start doing right away. Avoid drinking alcohol. It may increase your blood levels of propranolol. Propranolol is only part of a complete program of treatment for hypertension that may also include diet, exercise, and weight control. Follow your diet, medication, and exercise routines very closely if you are being treated for hypertension. If you are being treated for high blood pressure, keep using Propranolol even if you feel well. High blood pressure often has no symptoms. You may need to use blood pressure medication for the rest of your life.Medications used to treat schizophrenia, bipolar disorders, depression, epilepsy and migraines often have the side effect of weight gain. This side effect is thought to be due to the drugs affect on neurotransmitters, such as serotonin and norepinephine, which are found in the brain and are integral to many mental processes, including mood regulation, hunger and satiety.

Weight gain is particularly linked to many of the newer drugs used to treat psychiatric disorders. In an analysis of dozens of smaller drug studies, clozapine and olanzapine showed the greatest risk of weight gain and ziprasidone had the least risk. Lithium, a medication used to stabilize mood, may also work against weight loss.

Successful treatment of depression is also linked with weight gain or hindered weight loss. The reason for this finding may be either a reversal of the lack of appetite that is commonly seen with depression or a side effect of the medication used to treat the problem. Tricyclic antidepressants, especially amitriptyline, and monoamine oxidase inhibitors, such as phenelzine and tranyclypromine are more likely to cause a weight gain than selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors (SSRIs). As a group of related drugs, the SSRIs have different impacts on weight, depending on which drug is used. For example, paroxetine is linked with weight gain, nefazadone is weight neutral, and bupropion often promotes a modest weight loss.

Many medications used for the treatment of epilepsy and migraine headaches are linked with weight gain. An exception is topiramate, an antiseizure drug that is associated with weight loss.

Some of the information in this article is referenced to http://www.inderal.org